Naples Florida and Collier County Florida use 'CityView' software as a contractor tracking tool.

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VENTURA COUNTY NEWS False-Alarm Class Targets Blaring Problem Police: Oxnard's school aims to heighten awareness about the costly trend of bogus security-system calls. Other cities are considering offering similar courses.

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A proposed change to city law aims to weed out false alarm calls to the New Orleans Police Department - calls city leaders say are draining precious resources at an already understaffed department.

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WARNER ROBINS, Ga. — The Warner Robins Police Department is telling residents of this city, located near Macon, Ga., to ignore any correspondence they receive from a Maryland-based company the city contracts with to manage its false alarm program. In July 2015, the city adopted an alarm ordinance that instituted fines for multiple false alarms and established penalty amounts. Later that year the city contracted with Public Safety Corp. to administer its CryWolf software for false alarm management. However, a year later police suspended the implementation of the program after residents complained about invasive questioning. Under terms of the contract, Public Safety Corp. would get a cut every time a business or homeowner was fined, according to WMAZ-TV. But, by July of 2016 the City put the plan on hold saying CryWolf was asking intrusive questions. “They would call and ask questions such as, ‘Do you have guns in the house?’ And you know being in the community we’re in and a community just in the south in general, a lot of people find that intrusive, they want to understand why this is another government look into what’s going on in my home,” Evans said . Police and the City say they never approved those questions. Then, this month the company sent out letters asking people to re-register their alarms so police have now told the public to disregard any communications from CryWolf, according to a press release police sent last week.

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SAN DIEGO — The San Diego City Council voted to revise an alarm ordinance this week in an effort to reduce false alarms and free up law enforcement for higher priority tasks. The approval comes after eight years and multiple proposed revisions. To achieve final approval a second reading will be required along with a signature by San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer. Members of the alarm industry and the Security Industry Alarm Coalition (SIAC) advocated for the revision, which includes adopting enhanced call verification (ECV), during a city council hearing Monday (April 10). The council voted 6-3 in favor of the new policy, which sharply reduces permit fees for businesses and homeowners with alarm systems, but hikes fines for false alarms. The council was divided over whether alarm system owners should be fined for all false alarms, or whether they should be allowed to have one false alarm per year without incurring a fine.

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By SSI Staff · March 15, 2017 The man blames poor communication from the city for the excessive fines. False Alarms in the News Police in Kent., Wash., Will No Longer Respond to Nonverified Business Alarms False Alarm Fines Helping Boulder (Colo.) Police Prune Bogus Dispatches False Alarm Program Run by CryWolf Put on Hold in Georgia Municipality San Diego Approves False Alarm Ordinance Revision With Help From SIAC More on False Alarms Security Resource Probing the New Third-Party Central Station Relationship Full-Service Dealers with their Own In-House Security Monitoring Centers are Increasingly Turning to Third-Party Providers for a More Integrated Relationship More resources COLUMBUS, Ohio — A man was unknowingly fined $20,235 for excessive false alarms here last year. According to the Columbus Dispatch, Quincy Miller bought a boarded up triplex that he planned to rehab. He then installed an alarm system to protect the property. Between Feb. 29 and June 6, the security system tripped 48 times — with 43 of them false alarms, according to city records. The city sent letters to the house warning Miller of the fines for excessive false alarms, but he wasn’t living there and said he didn’t receive them. Miller assumed the alarms were ringing only to his cellphone, not the police, until the bill was forwarded to the address listed for the company that owned the property.

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This is a good video to watch which covers how false alarms work with the Police and Alarm Companies.

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